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Posts Tagged ‘Steampunk deer head’

Adding steampunk accessories

18 Nov

Now, I’m wrapping up the steampunk deer head so I can post some airship stuff!

To do this, I start adding the accessories that turn this sculpture from typical deer head into a steampunk sensation! In order to speed things up, I’m going to post a bunch of pictures in succession with captions, so here they are…

Nostril tube, eye LED and left ear mount

Nostril tube, eye LED and left ear mount

 

Close up showing ear in place

Close up showing ear in place

Addition of lens piece and battery

Addition of lens piece and battery

Detail of steampunk ear

Detail of steampunk ear

Now I make the plaque that the deer head mounts to so we can hang it on the wall.

Mounting plaque

Mounting plaque

And now the finished deer head, mounted for display.

Finished steampunk deer head mount

Finished steampunk deer head mount

This has been a fun project and I hope you liked seeing how you can repurpose everyday objects into cool pieces of artwork. I’d love to hear from you and find out what you think of these pieces!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Painting the fur on the deer head

28 Oct

Last time, I said I’d show how I painted the fur on the steampunk deer head. Remember that there is a tooled latex over the mâché which gives the illusion of fur, and with the addition of realistic painting, the deer mount itself begins to look quite convincing.

Base coats of paint

Base coats of paint

Base coat on eye

Base coat on eye

After basecoating everything, I went in and dry brushed white over the fur, then went back in with a light wash of brown to give the illusion of highlighted top fur.

Further color development

Further color development

After the brown fur is painted, the white areas are put in and the “natural” antler is doppled to look like natural horn.

White areas covered

White areas covered

Natural antler detail

Natural antler detail

Next post, I’ll show some of the steampunk accessories on the deer head as we get close to wrapping this project up…see you then!

 

 

 

 

Adding “fur” to the deer head

04 Sep
Latex "fur"

Latex “fur”

I first showed this technique when I posted the progress on my papier-mâché giraffe. It’s a relatively simple way that I came up with to add the illusion of fur on my sculptures, but have it be rigid and easy to paint. It involves using a simple latex caulk and tooling it to have little ridges or striations that resemble fur.

Fur around the ears

“Fur” around the ear

For the “natural” antler, I used the same latex, but didn’t tool it to look like fur. Instead, I smoothed it to look like the bumpy antler would look.

Latex on the antler

Latex on the antler

Latex smoothed out on the antler

Latex smoothed out on the antler

Next time, I’ll show the beginning stages on painting the deer head. Can’t wait!!

 

 

 

 

The battery compartment

01 Sep

As mentioned, the battery needs a believable housing and I started with a mint container, then cut it in half and created a lip so that a slide-on top was possible.

Mint container as a battery compartment

Mint container as a battery compartment

Building the battery compartment

As you can see, after the battery compartment was built, I added plastic pieces for detail and interest. I then painted the whole piece with an antiqued copper paint.

The painted battery case

The painted battery case

Then I added a patina with green acrylic paint…

Battery compartment with patina added

Battery compartment with patina added

Next time, I’ll show adding the “fur” to the steampunk deer. It’s coming together now! Stay tuned!

 

 

The mechanical cyborg steampunk eye (cont.)

25 Aug

Well life sort of got in the way and it’s been awhile since I last posted…sorry! To continue with the mechanical cyborg steampunk eye, I’m going to show what I applied beneath the eye before I attach it. My goal for the steampunk deer head was to make the cyborg eye light up. I figured while I was at it, a sublit antler would be cool too, but I’ll show that in another post.

I started with a small, single diode, battery operated LED light. Since this runs on a single 9-volt battery, I need to provide a housing for that, as well as a switch. I elected to go with a red push button type switch. I also want the light to be reflected so that it’s amplified a bit. A piece of foil from the packaging of a contact lens seems to fit the bill.

LED light, switch and reflector

LED light, switch and reflector

First, I added the foil for the reflector behind the cyborg eye…

Reflector in place

Reflector in place

Then I ran wires for the light, taped them in place, then went over them with more mache strips to conceal them.

Taped wires

Taped wires

More tape added

More tape added

Next post, I’ll show the building of the battery compartment…and I promise not to be gone so long!

 

 

The mechanical cyborg steampunk eye

20 Jul

First of all…an apology for not posting in so long, but after the show at the Artisan’s Bench, things got hectic. I not only got a couple orders for commissioned airship pieces, but I’ve been preparing a new workspace and all that has taken a lot of my time.

Today, I’m posting how I built the mechanical eye on the steampunk deer head. I had an old bakelite 220 plug cover that looked cool, so I scuffed it up and painted it copper, antiqued it with a green patina, then drilled out a hole large enough to accommodate an old magnifying glass that I’ve had literally for years. I thought that the combination of these two things would make a cool eye.

Painted Bakelite plug in upper left

Painted Bakelite plug in upper left

Drilled out Bakelite plug

Drilled out Bakelite plug

Magnifying glass in place

Magnifying glass in place

For grins, I thought I’d make the eye red. This is simple, since I collect pieces of broken auto tail lens as well… (don’t ask…). So I shaped a piece of this tail lens and glued that to the underside of the eye.

Tail lens piece and underside of eye

Tail lens piece and underside of eye

Lens in place in mechanical eye

Lens in place in mechanical eye

Now that I’ve shown the construction of the steampunk cyborg eye, I need to show what I decided to put under it, but I’ll save that for next time.

Stay tuned!

 

 

 

Steampunked ear on the deer head

14 Jun

OK, now that the Grand Opening is done at The Artisan’s Bench, I’ll get back to posting progress on the steampunk deer head mount. I said last time that I would show how I started putting together the steampunk ear. I did the “live” ear last post, which was corrugated cardboard covered in mache. The steampunked ear will obviously be mechanical looking.

I thought a piece that looked like a “receiver” would be a good place to start and I had an old brassy looking shower head that seemed to fit the bill. To hold the ear shape onto the base, I used a plastic jar lid that I had cut open and removed the top flat portion.

Jar lid cut for deer ear

Jar lid cut for deer ear

The ear base

The ear base

To form the ear, I used some white cardstock that I will paint to look like sheet copper.

Cardstock cut to ear shape

Cardstock cut to ear shape

Then, the cardstock gets attached to the plastic ring with glue and small screws and beads.

Cardstock bolted to the ear ring

Cardstock bolted to the ear ring

To make the center look more like it would pick up sound, I used a random plastic piece that looks like a stalk, and half of a cat toy.

Center "hearing" pieces

Center “hearing” pieces

All put together, we have this…

Ear all put together

Ear all put together

Finally, I painted the assembly using my favorite copper spray paint, then adding aging with a nice green patina.

Steampunk deer ear painted with patina added

Steampunk deer ear painted with patina added

Next time, I’ll construct more of the pieces that I want to add to the sculpture.

What steampunk projects do you have plans to construct?

 

 

 

 

 

Steampunk deer ears

16 May

Adding the defining elements to the steampunk deer is where the fun begins! Since the deer will have a steampunk cyborg aesthetic, part of it will be “natural” and part will be mechanical. I’ll start with the natural ear. I looked at my reference material and sculpted the base shape with corrugated cardboard.

Cardboard ear cut out

Cardboard ear cut out

As you can see, I had to cut the cardboard so that when folded and taped, it has a curve and dimension to it, as you can see below.

Taped together

Taped together

I then covered the whole thing with tape to seal and waterproof it before applying papier-mâché.

Covered with tape to waterproof

Covered with tape to waterproof

And now, I close the bottom and fit it with a wooden knob, drilled to accept a screw. This will allow it to be attached to the side of the deer head sculpture.

Taped to shape

Taped to shape

Added wooden knob

Added wooden knob

And now…covered in mache…

Covered in mache

Covered in mache

And now, the attachment to the deer head sculpture…

Ear attached to deer head

Ear attached to deer head

Next, I’ll show how I pulled together random repurposed, recycled pieces and parts to assemble the cyborg ear for the steampunk deer head sculpture. It’s really fun to reuse those things that otherwise get thrown in the trash!

Thank you for your continued interest in my work and stay tuned for my next post!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adding nostrils and mouth

29 Apr

As I add the papier-mâché to the outside of the steampunk deer head, I need to detail the nostrils and mouth on the steampunk deer head. As I said before, using masking tape to shape something in is fast and stable, then going over that with papier-mâché strengthens it. I use folded newspaper to get a shape, then tape it to the sculpture. I know newspapers are on the decline. I don’t know what I’m going to do for raw materials for amazing art when the newspapers go away. Recycling and repurposing them has been great for my art!

Forming mouth & nostrils

Forming mouth & nostrils

Now the taped mouth and nostrils.

Taped nostrils

Taped nostrils

Taped nostrils

Taped nostrils

Then we start to add the mâché over the top…

Mâché over the mouth and nostrils

Mâché over the mouth and nostrils

Mâché over nostrils

Mâché over nostrils

Next time, I’ll start building onto the deer head. Ears, steampunk accessories, etc.

 

 

 

 

More facial detail

18 Apr

Now that I’ve fleshed out the “real” antler, I need to add the rest of the flesh thickness to the deer head before I apply the papier-mâché.

Fleshing out the face

Fleshing out the face

The nose still hasn’t been defined yet, but that is a surface detail I’ll add later. I just wanted to get the thickness added and then I go over it with masking tape. I do this for a couple reasons. First, it secures everything in place instantly. Second, it sort of water/moisture proofs the paper below for when I add mâché over the top in the next step. I used to feel guilty about using masking tape. I guess I felt some sort of need to be a purist and masking tape seemed like cheating. Well, I got over that once I realized the benefits of using it and it also dawned on me that masking tape IS paper, only it already has adhesive on it…DUH!

As I added tape to cover the form, I continued to add detail to the antler…

Taping the antler

Taping the antler

As I add tape to the face and neck, it’s also time to put definition around the eye in the form of eyelids.

 

Masking tape eyelids

Masking tape eyelids

Eyelid close-up

Eyelid close-up

Now we begin to add the papier-mâché over the masking tape, including the antler.

Beginning the mâché process

Beginning the mâché process

As you can see, the left side of the steampunk deer head sculpture does not have an eye. This is because this will be the side that has the steampunk cyborg “appliance” for an eye. It will also have a cyborg ear and other hardware.

Another thing you will notice from the picture above is the white tub with the paint brush on top. This container has a 50-50 blend of water and white PVA glue. Again, I’m not a purist…or at least I try not to be. Art is about improvisation and innovation as much as anything else. I’ve always found the typical flour/water or wallpaper paste recipes for papier-mâché “glue” to be messy, lumpy, cumbersome and slow to dry. Instead, I use the glue mixture, brush it on, lay down a newspaper strip and brush on more glue to smooth things out. It’s fast, less messy and it dries a lot faster than flour paste. It costs a little more, but it’s way WORTH IT!!

Papier-mâché around the eye

Papier-mâché around the eye

Next time, I’ll show how I added the details of the nostrils and mouth. Hope you stay tuned for that…and while you’re at it, please share this blog with your friends, on Pinterest and like my Facebook page!

 

Facial detail on steampunk deer head

11 Apr

Starting to add facial details like building up the shape for eyes and nose is what I’ll talk about now. Before I added paper to “flesh out” the neck of the deer, I had put some recycled wood cross pieces in the head to widen the base. Part of the reason for this was to provide an anchor place for the eye(s). Now that I’m adding eyes, the base puts them in approximately the right place.

Cross piece for eye mounting

Cross piece for eye mounting

I had to cut a bit off the top to get the angle right, then I drilled a hole in the cross piece for a wooden dowel, glued that in, then did the same on a wooden half-sphere I had lying around. When I say “lying around”, I mean it. My wife kinda gets ticked off because I have so much “stuff” I collect for parts. The sphere piece was in a bag of random wooden shapes I bought quite awhile ago, on sale at a craft store for a couple bucks. You never know when stuff is going to come in handy! I base coated the sphere black and glued it in place.

Base coated "hemisphere" in place

Base coated “hemisphere” in place

Later, I can build the structure around the “eye” that will be the brow and cheek of the deer on this side. Right now, I want to add thickness and substance to the “real” antler. Once I do that, I’ll be able to finish smoothing out the “skin” on the rest of the head and neck.

Adding substance to the "real" antler

Adding substance to the “real” antler

More substance...

More substance…

And more substance...

And more substance…

Wrapping it up

Wrapping it up

Now, I just wrapped the antler with more masking tape to secure the paper and smooth it out a bit. I need to add shape and definition to the face and nose too, but I’ll save that for next time…

Keep your eyes peeled!

 

 

 

 

 

Adding “flesh” to the steampunk deer head

05 Apr

Now that provisions for the antlers are in place, I can start to “flesh out” the deer head. I began by filling the void areas in the wooden armature with wads of newspaper, then going over that with rolled newspaper, which I fl;attened out a bit and trimmed to fit. I taped those pieces in place with masking tape and kept building on that until the desired shape was reached, reffering often to several different photos I’d printed from the net.

Adding "flesh" to the deer head

Adding “flesh” to the deer head

More layering….

A more smoothed out look

A more smoothed out look

Once I had the basic shape I wanted, I decided to spray the “copper” antler so I didn’t have to be careful with where the paint went. I knew I’d be covering the newspaper later.

Copper sprayed antler

Copper sprayed antler

The “real” antler will wait until I start adding the actual mâché to the deer head. But for next time, I’ll add detail to the face and that will include providing a base for the eyes, both “real” and cyborg…

Don’t miss it!

 

 

 

Steampunk deer antlers

01 Apr

Now I’ll show how I constructed the antlers for the steampunk deer head. I originally wanted to make one antler look natural, while the other look like a steampunk cyborg replacement of copper pipe. The problem is, the price of copper is so high right now, that it would have cost $50 just in that small amount for the antler. I decided that I could do a good job of making PVC look like copper with only a fraction of the cost. With some research, I arrived at a design for my antlers and got to work.

The natural side would be made of papier-mâché, but would need an armature. Looking around my junk pile, I found an old rusty drill bit extender that I bent into the right shape and glued it into a drilled out hole in the deer head armature.

Bent drill bit extender as armature

Bent drill bit extender as armature

From here, I added another piece of metal rod I found, then bent into shape, and used the tightening nut on the drill bit extender to affix it.

More length added and bent into shape

More length added and bent into shape

Then, I found an old leaf rake head and removed a couple metal tines and bent them around the rods and Gorilla glued them in place as the armature for spikehorns on the antler. Great way to upcycle and repurpose some old junk!

Rake tines as spikehorns

Rake tines as spikehorns

For the pipe side, I began by drilling a hole in the wooden armature that was large enough to accomodate a threaded PVC coupler and glued and screwed in in place.

PVC coupler as anchor for pipe antler

Now the rest of the antler can be cut, shaped and glued into place.

The whole rack, ready for detailing

The whole rack, ready for detailing

Next time, I’ll show how I began adding the thickness of the flesh to the deer head and how I made provisions for the eyes. Stay tuned!